Donald Trump

Arendt, Schmitt and Trump’s Politics of ‘Nation’. De Feisal G. Mohamed

b8e69450cf1f9277974f4beb5f288180-bpfull

Feisal G. Mohamed (@FGMohamed) is a professor of English at the Graduate Center, City University of New York. His most recent book is “A New Deal for the Humanities: Liberal Arts and the Future of Public Higher Education,” edited with Gordon Hutner.

, 22 julio 2016 / THE NEW YORK TIMES

One of the messages most often delivered at the 2016 Republican National Convention was that of unity. Not party unity, which clearly does not exist, but national unity, a goal to be achieved by setting aside the divisiveness of politics as usual. Never mind that the chant most often heard from the floor was “build that wall,” a hysterical fantasy of division, of casting out the undocumented workers who are, by any reasonable measure, integral to American society.

It is easy, and maybe accurate, to dismiss this as the kind of self-contradiction and doublespeak that is the Republicans’ stock-in-trade, but it is also more than that.

Listening to Donald J. Trump’s acceptance speech, I felt as though the election was turning into a battle between two very different, though equally formidable, 20th-century political philosophers, Carl Schmitt and Hannah Arendt. “The specific political distinction to which political actions and motives can be reduced,” Schmitt wrote in his 1927 work, “The Concept of the Political,” “is that between friend and enemy.” It is a statement meant to be descriptive, rather than prescriptive: The friend-enemy distinction is central to politics in the same way that a good-evil distinction is central to ethics and a beautiful-ugly distinction is central to aesthetics. All other considerations are peripheral to this core concern.

The considerations that Schmitt especially wishes to strip away are the legal and procedural ones central to defenses of the liberal state. Such defenses ignore the question of the political at their own peril, by reducing public life to a constant competition among interest groups and political factions with no overarching sense of purpose.

NEW YORK TOMES NYTIn many ways this has been the message of the Trump campaign all along, crystallized in his convention speech. At several points, he emphasized that his republic will be a polity of caring. But he also strained mightily to identify the groups posing an obstacle to this goal: undocumented workers and Islamic terrorists. Responsibility for a supposed rising tide of crime was placed squarely at the doorstep of Mexican migrants and Islamic State sympathizers. The presence of these groups in our midst is, in this view, preventing true political community from emerging.

This identification of enemies was entirely in keeping with Trump’s rhetoric, but in presenting the case so starkly he freed himself to identify friends in ways that were somewhat surprising given the setting. Despite the open hostility to the Black Lives Matter movement apparent at the convention throughout the week, African-Americans received mention from Trump as victims of globalization suffering from joblessness and urban decay. This move collapsed the racial division between poor whites and poor blacks that Republicans so often exploit, replacing it with a focus on the plight of all workers who are Americans.

Even more surprising were the huge cheers in response to Trump’s vow to defend the L.G.B.T.Q. community from Islamic extremists — a turn of events that seemed to surprise the speaker himself, who paused to compliment the crowd on its decision momentarily to set aside one of the party’s pet bigotries. This alchemical change was of course effected in the crucible of Orlando, Fla. Here we see how blood sacrifice at the hands of an enemy can alter the terms of political friendship, allowing a previously marginalized group a path to the center of political life. It is a core insight of one of Schmitt’s finest current readers, Paul W. Kahn, in his books “Sacred Violence” and “Political Theology,” that American politics often works in this way, as when African-American sacrifice during World War II was mobilized to broaden anti-segregationist consensus.

23stoneWeb-blog427Such is the kind of unity that Trump has sought to forge. By heaping hatred on foreign elements within America’s borders, he seeks to thicken the meaning of the nation as a category. In a way resembling Schmitt’s thought on sovereignty, he imagines the nation as an organic entity whose will is expressed through him. Or, put differently, he seeks to restore the racial and familial implications always at play in its Latin root, nationem, from nascor, to be born. In this way it is entirely fitting Trump was introduced by his daughter Ivanka, and that the week featured his children much more prominently than it did the usual party functionaries. We are being invited to join them under the beneficent wing of his paternal care.

Not all of us will accept the invitation. And in this respect we will share the skepticism of Hannah Arendt, whose core insight in her indispensable book “The Origins of Totalitarianism” is that the path to totalitarianism is cleared when the nation-state hyphen is severed, when the nation becomes an exclusive group that must defend itself through actions residing outside of the law and beyond the protections afforded by state institutions and procedures. Once the logic of a threatened national genus is accepted, emergency action grossly expanding the brutal exercise of state power is not far behind.

In this light, the Arendtian in the presidential race of 2016 would appear to be Hillary Clinton. One obvious sign of this is Clinton’s pledge to admit many more refugees from the Syrian conflict into the United States. In the most famous chapter of “The Origins,” Arendt harshly criticizes all those European and North American powers who had refused entrance to refugees during World War II, even characterizing them as participants in the Nazi program of imposing statelessness on European Jewry. Clinton has signaled that she will not repeat this mistake.

Clinton is also clearly much more statist than Trump, and in fact it is difficult to discern in her rhetoric a sense of nationhood standing apart from state institutions and policies — this is a major source of her emotional deficit as a politician. Hers is a politics of the achievable, of incremental progress within received institutional bounds, trained by the kind of long experience that breeds familiarity with the workings of government.

But statism is not an end in itself for Arendt, and we can certainly imagine her having misgivings about Clinton. In a curious moment of agreement with Schmitt, Arendt cites him in “The Origins,” in describing the state’s rising domination and possession of the category of nationhood in the 18th and 19th centuries leads wealthy and powerful elites to claim that they are rising above party faction only when it suits their interests. In an even curiouser moment of agreement, when Schmitt later articulates his thought on this development in the context of the 1848 uprisings that erupted across Europe, he relies on Karl Marx’s analysis in “The Eighteenth Brumaire of Napoleon Bonaparte.”

Uniting these three very different political philosophers, Arendt, Schmitt and Marx, is an insight on the ways in which pure statism inherently favors moneyed interests. Without some sort of pressure from the sphere of political action, the levers of the state fall all too readily into the hands of the wealthy and well connected. For Arendt this leads to a politics where Enlightenment principles like justice and equality are hollowed of significance and used only to advance the agenda of the powerful.

So when several commentators on the right and left accuse Clinton of being beholden to banks and corporations, we can imagine Arendt paying close attention. As is clear from “The Human Condition,” the portions of the liberal tradition that mattered to Arendt emphasize a political space for the kind of human creativity that has positive civic effect. This she likens to the human capacity for procreation: Just as we have the power to bring new human beings into the world, so also we have the power to bring new ideas into the world that reshape their environment, having ripple effects of responses that are also new. This is our highest calling, and highest achievement, as social and political beings. If Arendt is a liberal, she is a liberal with a significant civic republican streak.

Schmitt is widely, and justly, despised as a person and thinker for having joined the Nazi party in 1933 and refusing to submit to denazification after the war. But his insights on the way politics works still prove to be remarkably, if also lamentably, useful. Trump, like Schmitt, sees the government of his time as having failed, and seeks to heighten our sense of political emergency.

On the other side is Clinton, who with Arendtian poise casts cold water on a tribalist politics — she has admirably not responded in kind, even if she has frequently indulged in a politics of fear by playing up the monstrosity of her opponent. But if we truly cast our lot with Arendt’s political philosophy, as so many of us do either knowingly or unknowingly, we might find that both candidates leave us wanting.

 

The front page we hope we never have to print. The Boston Globe

El domingo 10 de abril, el periódico THE BOSTON GLOBE imprimió una portada que, según su Editorial Board, “esperamos que nunca tendremos que publicar”. Al interior de la edición el Globe publica el editorial que abajo reproducimos.

Segunda Vuelta

Ideas-Trump-front-page

The GOP must stop Trump. Editorial

10 abril 2016 / THE BOSTON GLOBE

Donald J. Trump’s vision for the future of our nation is as deeply disturbing as it is profoundly un-American.

Screen Shot 2016-04-10 at 11.48.31 PMIt is easy to find historical antecedents. The rise of demagogic strongmen is an all too common phenomenon on our small planet. And what marks each of those dark episodes is a failure to fathom where a leader’s vision leads, to carry rhetoric to its logical conclusion. The satirical front page of this section attempts to do just that, to envision what America looks like with Trump in the White House.

It is an exercise in taking a man at his word. And his vision of America promises to be as appalling in real life as it is in black and white on the page. It is a vision that demands an active and engaged opposition. It requires an opposition as focused on denying Trump the White House as the candidate is flippant and reckless about securing it.

After Wisconsin, the odds have shrunk that Trump will arrive in Cleveland with the requisite 1,237 delegates needed to win the nomination outright. Yet if he’s denied that nomination for falling short of the required delegates, Trump has warned, “You’d have riots. I think you’d have riots.” Indeed, who knows what Trump’s fervent backers are capable of if emboldened by the defeat of their strongman at the hands of the hated party elite.

But the rules are the rules — and if no candidate reaches that magic number, the job of choosing a nominee falls to those on the convention floor.

Screen Shot 2016-04-10 at 11.52.08 PMThat’s not a pretty picture. But then nothing about the billionaire real estate developer’s quest for the nation’s highest office has been pretty. He winks and nods at political violence at his rallies. He says he wants to “open up” libel laws to punish critics in the news media and calls them “scum.” He promised to shut out an entire class of immigrants and visitors to the United States on the sole basis of their religion.

The toxic mix of violent intimidation, hostility to criticism, and explicit scapegoating of minorities shows a political movement is taking hold in America. If Trump were a politician running such a campaign in a foreign country right now, the US State Department would probably be condemning him.

Realizing that the party faces a double bind, a few conservatives have been clear-eyed enough to see the need for a plausible, honorable alternative that could emerge from the likely contested convention. Names like Paul Ryan and Mitt Romney have come up. If no candidate gets a majority on the convention’s first ballot, such a nomination might be theoretically possible.

This would have no modern precedent: Ordinarily, parties put aside their differences after primaries and rally to the front-runner because they share basic common goals and values. In any other election cycle, anti-Trump Republicans would just look like sore losers. But Trump lacks those common values — not just the values of Republicans but, it becomes clearer every day, those of Democrats.

House Speaker Ryan spoke to the possible long-term damage with which the party is flirting. “Leaders with different visions and ideas have come and gone; parties have risen and fallen; majorities and White Houses won and lost,” he said. “But the way we govern endures: through debate, not disorder.” The problem is that Trump has already crossed lines that a politician with a sincere commitment to democratic norms must never cross.

At some point, after the election, Republicans will also need to ask themselves some tough questions about how their actions and inactions made the party vulnerable to Trump. After all, a candidate spewing anti-immigrant, anti-Muslim, authoritarian rhetoric didn’t come out of nowhere; the Tea Party has been strong enough long enough that someone like him shouldn’t be a surprise. Chasing short-term political gains, the GOP missed a lot of chances to fight the hateful currents that now threaten to overwhelm it.

For now, Republicans ought to focus on doing the right thing: putting up every legitimate roadblock to Trump that they can. Unexpectedly, a key moment in American democracy has snuck up on the GOP. When he denounced Trump, Romney said he wanted to be able to say he’d fought the good fight against a demagogue. That’s the test other Republicans may want to consider.

Action doesn’t mean political chicanery or subterfuge. It doesn’t mean settling for an equally extreme — and perhaps more dangerous — nominee in Ted Cruz. If the party can muster the courage to reject its first-place finisher, rejecting the runner-up should be even easier.

The Republican Party’s standard deserves to be hoisted by an honorable and decent man, like Romney or Ryan, elected on the convention floor. It is better to lose with principle than to accept a dangerous deal from a demagogue.

No nos confundamos. De Cristina López

Cristina López, Lic. en Derecho de la ESEN con maestría en Políticas Públicas de Georgetown University.

Cristina López, Lic. en Derecho de la ESEN con maestría en Políticas Públicas de Georgetown University.

Cristina López, 29 febrero 2016 / EDH

Las elecciones en los Estados Unidos han alcanzado un ímpetu de espiral descendiente que ningún analista pudo haber predicho. Las posibilidades de que Donald Trump llegue a ocupar el puesto de lumbreras como George Washington son ahora bastante reales, con todo y que su plan de gobierno no cuente con un solo específico en materia de políticas públicas y que sus propuestas estén compuestas más por ataques ad-hominem que de ideales de filosofía política. Lo peor no necesariamente es el candidato: son sus seguidores. Las encuestas han demostrado que no es la demografía o la ideología necesariamente lo que explica su leal club de fans: es el autoritarismo. Sus seguidores coincidieron en que era la característica que principalmente les atraía a Trump, y de manera similarmente preocupante, otra encuesta demostró que un 20 por ciento de los seguidores de Trump consideran que la emancipación de los esclavos fue un error y un tercio considera que las personas gay deberían tener prohibida la entrada a los Estados Unidos.

El panorama por el otro lado no es mejor, y casi, casi recuerda a la situación en que el Nobel de Literatura Mario Vargas Llosa describió la elección en Perú en la que se enfrentaban Keiko Fujimori contra Ollanta Humala como la “disyuntiva de diario hoydecidir entre el sida y el cáncer terminal”. Los demócratas tienen la amenaza de Bernie Sanders, que con una plataforma radical, pero monotemáticamente enfocada en la desigualdad económica, está prometiendo la imposibilidad fáctica (en base a las realidades fiscales actuales) de otorgar educación gratuita, con independencia de que pasar reformas que en comparación son tibiamente moderadas, como Obamacare o una reforma migratoria, sea imposible con la actual composición legislativa.

Las estridencias tanto de Trump como de Sanders, han llevado a que muchos Latinoamericanos – aún en recuperación por los traumas graves que nos ha dejado el populismo carnívoro del socialismo del siglo 21, lleno de propuestas estridentes con pocos resultados en materia de desarrollo – hayan caído en la tentación de comparar las candidaturas de Donald Trump o Bernie Sanders con payasos del circo político del calibre de Hugo Chávez o Nicolás Maduro. Los medios conservadores han tomado la comparación como punta de lanza para pintar el escenario apocalíptico de que de ganar uno de los dos, Trump o Sanders, los Estados Unidos se convertiría en una copia al carbón de Venezuela, y no precisamente por el clima.

A ver: no nos confundamos. La comparación entre Sanders/Trump con (inserte el nombre del populista latinoamericano de turno de su preferencia) tiene tanto de acertada como decir que un tomate y una manzana son lo mismo solo por que ambos son considerados fruta. Si bien las consecuencias para las políticas públicas son difíciles de predecir si las presidencias de Sanders/Trump se vuelven algo más que un ejercicio hipotético, lo que sí es definitivo es que el sistema, el de una república con pesos y contra pesos, no va a cambiar.

Precisamente por la rigidez —a veces incluso irritante— del sistema, es que Estados Unidos difícilmente se convertirá en la Venezuela en la que se persigue con la fuerza del estado a los opositores políticos y se los apresa, la que reformó la Constitución para expandir el ejercicio del poder presidencial y no el de los derechos individuales. En su diseño del sistema, los fundadores de la república en Estados Unidos volcaron la desconfianza absoluta que les había generado la manera que se ejercía el poder en una monarquía. Por eso, los cambios radicales o las revoluciones políticas en Estados Unidos difícilmente pueden conseguirse en una administración. Son necesarios varios ciclos electorales para cambiar la composición de las dos cámaras del legislativo, que tiene la capacidad de detener o entrampar cualquier cambio impulsado por el ejecutivo. Y, en última instancia, la Corte Suprema es el último bastión para proteger los derechos del individuo, y a menos que cayera un asteroide sobre su edificio, es poco lo que puede hacer un presidente para cambiar totalmente la composición ideológica de la magistratura. En pocas palabras: la estructura institucional y estado de derecho propios de la república liberal son la razón por la que ni el peor populista podría convertir a Estados Unidos en un paraíso del populismo. No nos confundamos.

@crislopezg

Intelectuales hispanos publican un manifiesto contra Donald Trump

Escritores, artistas y cineastas de México, Estados Unidos, España y América Latina critican el “discurso de odio” del candidato.

Donald Trump en la presentación de su libro en Nueva York. / Noam Galai (WireImage)

Donald Trump en la presentación de su libro en Nueva York. / Noam Galai (WireImage)

3 noviembre 2015 / EL PAIS

el paisUn grupo de 67 intelectuales, artistas, científicos, escritores y cineastas de Estados Unidos, América Latina y España han firmado un manifiesto en el que rechazan el “discurso de odio” de Donald Trump, candidato republicano a la presidencia de Estados Unidos. El empresario utilizó términos xenófobos para referirse a los inmigrantes mexicanos durante la presentación de su campaña este verano, un lenguaje que, según los firmantes, “recuerda a campañas históricas contra otros grupos étnicos que terminaron con millones de muertes”.

“Su discurso de odio apela a las más bajas pasiones, como la xenofobia, el machismo, la intolerancia política y el dogmatismo religioso”, dice la carta, que también alerta de que “las agresiones físicas contra los hispanos y los llamados a prohibir el uso público del español han comenzado ya”.

Los firmantes hacen referencia también a las contribuciones de los hispanos a la economía estadounidense y citan el ejemplo de California, donde asciende a 70.000 millones de dólares al año. “Sin los trabajadores mexicanos, la economía del Estado, seguida del resto del país, se iría a la ruina”.

El grupo de intelectuales -“muchos somos inmigrantes hispanos que hemos sido bien acogidos en esta gran nación”- califica la actuación de Trump en la campaña de “indigna” y piden a los votantes estadounidenses que “cesen de tolerar sus absurdas posturas”. A continuación reproducimos el manifiesto impulsado por Enrique Krauze y Carmelo Mesa-Lago:

Declaración de Intelectuales, Científicos y Académicos Hispanos contra Xenofobia de Trump

Los abajo firmantes, hispanos que ocupamos puestos en la academia de los Estados Unidos, así como intelectuales, artistas y científicos de México, América Latina y España, nos negamos a guardar silencio frente a las alarmantes declaraciones del candidato a la Presidencia de los EEUU Donald Trump.

Desde el anuncio de su candidatura, ha acusado a los inmigrantes mexicanos de ser criminales, violadores y traficantes de drogas, ha prometido deportar a 11 millones de ellos y ha hablado de construir un gran muro a todo lo largo de la frontera con México. Su discurso de odio apela a las más bajas pasiones, como la xenofobia, el machismo, la intolerancia política y el dogmatismo religioso. Todo lo cual inevitablemente recuerda campañas que en el pasado se han dirigido contra otros grupos étnicos, y cuya consecuencia fue la muerte de millones de personas. De hecho, las agresiones físicas contra los hispanos y los llamados a prohibir el uso público del español han comenzado ya.

Los ataques verbales del Sr. Trump no se basan en estadísticas y hechos comprobados sino en su muy personal e infundada opinión. No sólo desdeña a los inmigrantes hispanos (después podrían seguir otros grupos étnicos) sino que exhibe una peligrosa actitud contra sus oponentes, a quienes tacha de estúpidos o débiles. A los entrevistadores, los ha acusado de tener motivos turbios y expulsó de una rueda de prensa a un prominente periodista hispano que le planteó una pregunta incómoda. Trump ha lanzado comentarios soeces sobre las mujeres. Sus guardaespaldas y seguidores atacan a manifestantes pacíficos.

La expulsión de los inmigrantes mexicanos sería catastrófica para estados como California, Arizona, Nuevo México y Texas, donde la mayor parte del trabajo manual es mexicano. En California, por ejemplo, esos inmigrantes cosechan 200 productos agrícolas, sirven en hoteles y restaurantes, recogen la basura, ejercen, en suma, oficios que los americanos locales se rehúsan a desempeñar. California es el principal fabricante de vino y de muchos productos agropecuarios en el país. Es también el primer destinatario de turismo. Estos sectores generan US$70.000 millones anuales, pero sin los trabajadores mexicanos la economía del estado se iría a la ruina. Algo similar ocurriría en el resto del país.

Muchos de los firmantes somos inmigrantes hispanos que hemos sido bien acogidos en esta gran nación y contribuido con nuestro trabajo, en diversos campos, al conocimiento, los avances de las ciencias, a la prosperidad, el entretenimiento y el bienestar de todos los habitantes de los Estados Unidos. La conducta del Sr. Trump es indigna de un candidato a la presidencia del país más poderoso del mundo. Condenamos esa actitud y esperamos que el pueblo estadounidense cese de tolerar sus absurdas posturas.

Héctor Abad Faciolince

Manuel Alcántara

Arturo Álvarez-Buylla

Homero Aridjis

Ariel Armory

Roger Bartra

Demián Bichir

Silvia Borzutzky

Carmen Boullosa

Martín Caparrós

Jorge Castañeda

Jennifer Clement

Junot Díaz

Ramón Díaz Alejandro

Jorge Duany

Jorge Edwards

Sebastián Edwards

Joaquín Estefanía

Julio Frenk

Francisco Goldman

Francisco González Crussí

Alejandro González Iñárritu

Teodoro González de León

Roberto González Echeverría

Enrique Krauze

Mario Lavista

Antonio Lazcano

Emmanuel Lubezki

Valeria Luiselli

Diego Luna

Nora Lustig

Carlos Malamud

David Mares

Ibsen Martínez

Óscar Martínez

Eduardo Matos Moctezuma

Carmelo Mesa-Lago

Verónica Montecinos

Antonio Muñoz Molina

Moisés Naím

Enrique Norten

Silvia Pedraza

Elena Poniatowska

Alejandro Portes

Luis Prados

Rodrigo Rey Rosa

Rafael Rojas

Vicente Rojo

Ranulfo Romo

Diego Sánchez-Ancochea

Antonio Santamaría García

Arturo Sarukhán

José Sarukhán

Fernando Savater

Javier Sicilia

Eduardo Silva

Guillermo Soberón Acevedo

Edward Telles

Mauricio Tenorio

Antonio Ugalde

Diego Valadés

Álvaro Vargas Llosa

Mario Vargas Llosa

Enrique Vila-Matas

Rolando Villazón

Juan Villoro

Gabriel Zaid

Mr. Trump’s conduct is not worthy of a candidate to the Presidency of the United States

A group of 67 prominent intellectuals, scientists, artists and award-winning authors from Mexico and the rest of Ibero-America have signed a statement blasting Republican pre-candidate Donald Trump’s “hate speech,” which they say “recalls historical campaigns against other ethnic groups that led to millions of deaths.”

3 noviembre 2015 / FUSION

fusionThe undersigned – Hispanics who occupy academic positions in the United States, as well as intellectuals, artists and scientists from Mexico, other Latin American countries and Spain – cannot remain silent in the fact of alarming statements from the candidate to the Presidency of the United States, Donald Trump. Since the announcement of his candidacy, Mr. Trump has accused Mexican immigrants of being criminals, rapists and drug traffickers; and has promised to deport 11 million of them and build a big wall along the border with Mexico. Trump’s hate speech appeals to xenophobia, sexism and political intolerance; it recalls historical campaigns against other ethnic groups that led to millions of deaths. Physical attacks on Hispanics and public assertions that Spanish should not be spoken in public have already occurred.

Mr. Trump’s verbal assaults are not based on tested facts, but only on his personal, baseless opinions. Not only does he disdain Hispanic immigrants, but he also exhibits a dangerous attitude toward his opponents, stigmatizing them as stupid or weak. He has insulted and expelled a prominent Hispanic reporter from a press conference an uncomfortable question and made sexist comments about female interviewers, while his supporters and personal bodyguards have attacked peaceful demonstrators.

The expulsion of Mexican immigrants would be catastrophic for states such as California, Arizona, New Mexico and Texas, where Mexicans carry out most manual work. In California our immigrants harvest 200 agricultural products, serve in hotels and restaurants, and collect garbage. California is the leading producer of wine in the country and the principal destination for tourism. These sectors generate $70 billion per year. Without Mexican workers, the economy of the state, followed swiftly by the rest of the country, would go to ruin.

Several of the undersigned are Hispanic immigrants who have been well-received by this great nation and contributed through their various endeavors toward greater knowledge, scientific progress, entertainment, and prosperity for all Americans. Mr. Trump’s conduct is not worthy of a candidate to the Presidency of the United States, the most powerful country in the world. All of us condemn his behavior and hope that the American people will no longer tolerate his absurdities.

Héctor Abad Faciolince

Manuel Alcántara

Arturo Álvarez-Buylla

Homero Aridjis

Ariel Armory

Roger Bartra

Demián Bichir

Silvia Borzutzky

Carmen Boullosa

Martín Caparrós

Jorge Castañeda

Jennifer Clement

Junot Díaz

Ramón Díaz Alejandro

Jorge Duany

Related

Jorge Edwards

Sebastián Edwards

Joaquín Estefanía

Julio Frenk

Francisco Goldman

Francisco González Crussí

Alejandro González Iñárritu

Teodoro González de León

Roberto González Echeverría

Enrique Krauze

Mario Lavista

Antonio Lazcano

Emmanuel Lubezki

Valeria Luiselli

Diego Luna

Nora Lustig

Carlos Malamud

David Mares

Ibsen Martínez

Óscar Martínez

Eduardo Matos Moctezuma

Carmelo Mesa-Lago

Verónica Montecinos

Antonio Muñoz Molina

Moisés Naím

Enrique Norten

Silvia Pedraza

Elena Poniatowska

Alejandro Portes

Luis Prados

Rodrigo Rey Rosa

Rafael Rojas

Vicente Rojo

Ranulfo Romo

Diego Sánchez-Ancochea

Antonio Santamaría García

Arturo Sarukhán

José Sarukhán

Fernando Savater

Javier Sicilia

Eduardo Silva

Guillermo Soberón Acevedo

Edward Telles

Mauricio Tenorio

Antonio Ugalde

Diego Valadés

Álvaro Vargas Llosa

Mario Vargas Llosa

Enrique Vila-Matas

Rolando Villazón

Juan Villoro

Gabriel Zaid

Un millonario se divierte. De Mario Vargas Llosa

A pesar de los dislates racistas de Donald Trump, Estados Unidos son la mejor prueba de que puede prosperar una sociedad multirracial, multicultural y multirreligiosa, que concede oportunidades a quien quiere trabajar.

Mario Vargas Llosa, premio nobel de literatura

Mario Vargas Llosa, premio nobel de literatura

Mario Vargas Llosa, 9 agosto 2015 / EL PAIS

Entre los millonarios, como entre los demás seres comunes y corrientes, hay de todo: gentes de gran talento y esforzado trabajo, que han hecho su fortuna prestando una gran contribución a la humanidad, como Bill Gates o Warren Buffett, y que, además, destinan buena parte de su inmensa fortuna a obras de beneficencia y servicio social, o imbéciles racistas como el señor Donald Trump, ridículo personaje que no sabe qué hacer con su tiempo y sus millones y se divierte en estos días como aspirante presidencial republicano insultando a la comunidad hispánica de Estados Unidos —más de cincuenta millones de personas— que, según él, son una chusma infecta de ladrones y violadores.

Los dislates de un payaso con dinero no tendrían mayor importancia si las estupideces que Trump dice a diestra y siniestra en su campaña política —entre ellas figuran los insultos al senador McCain, que peleó en Vietnam, fue torturado y pasó años en un campo de concentración del Vietcong— no hubieran tocado un nervio en el electorado norteamericano y lo hubieran catapultado a un primer lugar entre los precandidatos del Partido Republicano. Por lo visto, entre éstos, sólo Jeb Bush, que está casado con una mexicana, se ha atrevido a criticarlo; los demás han mirado a otro lado, y por lo menos uno de ellos, el senador Ted Cruz (de Texas), ha apoyado sus diatribas.

Pero, por fortuna, la respuesta de la sociedad civil en Estados Unidos a las obscenidades de Donald Trump ha sido contundente. Han roto con él varias cadenas de televisión, como Univision y Televisa, las tiendas Macy’s, el empresario Carlos Slim, muchas publicaciones y un gran número de artistas de cine, cantantes, escritores, e incluso el chef español José Andrés, muy conocido en Estados Unidos, que iba a abrir uno de sus restaurantes en un hotel de Trump, se ha negado a hacerlo luego de sus declaraciones racistas.

La cultura reduce los torvos brotes de racismo,
pero nunca llegan a desaparecer del todo

¿Es bueno o malo que el tema racial, hasta ahora evitado en las campañas políticas norteamericanas, salga a la luz e incluso pase a ser protagonista en la próxima elección presidencial? Hay quienes consideran que, pese a las sucias razones que han empujado a Donald Trump a servirse de él —vanidad y soberbia— no es malo que el asunto se ventile abiertamente, en vez de estar supurando en la sombra, sin que nadie lo contradiga y refute las falsas estadísticas en que pretende apoyarse el racismo antihispánico. Tal vez tengan razón. Por ejemplo, las afirmaciones de Trump han permitido que distintas agencias y encuestadoras de Estados Unidos demuestren que es absolutamente falso que la inmigración mexicana haya venido creciendo sistemáticamente. Por el contrario, la propia Oficina del Censo (según un artículo de Andrés Oppenheimer) acaba de hacer saber que en la última década el flujo migratorio procedente de México cayó de 400.000 a 125.000 el año pasado. Y que la tendencia sigue siendo decreciente.

Caricarura: Fernando Vicente/El Pais

Caricarura: Fernando Vicente/El Pais

El problema es que el racismo no es nunca racional, no está jamás sustentado en datos objetivos, sino en prejuicios, suspicacias y miedos inveterados hacia el “otro”, el que es distinto, tiene otro color de piel, habla otra lengua, adora a otros dioses y practica costumbres diferentes. Por eso es tan difícil derrotarlo con ideas, apelando a la sensatez. Todas las sociedades, sin excepción, alientan en su seno esos sentimientos torvos, contra los que, a menudo, la cultura es ineficaz y a veces impotente. Ella los reduce, desde luego, y a menudo los sepulta en el inconsciente colectivo. Pero nunca llegan a desaparecer del todo y, sobre todo en los momentos de confusión y de crisis, suelen, atizados por demagogos políticos o fanáticos religiosos, aflorar a la superficie y producir los chivos expiatorios en los que grandes sectores, a veces incluso la mayoría de la población, se exonera a sí misma de sus responsabilidades y descarga toda la culpa de sus males en “el judío”, “el árabe”, “el negro” o “el mexicano”. Remover aquellas aguas puercas de los bajos fondos irracionales es sumamente peligroso, pues el racismo es siempre fuente de violencias atroces y puede llegar a destruir la convivencia pacífica y socavar profundamente los derechos humanos y la libertad.

Es muy probable que, pese a la incultura de que hace gala en todo lo que dice y hace el señor Donald Trump —empezando por sus horribles y ostentosos rascacielos— intuya que sus insultos a los estadounidenses de origen latino o hispano son absolutamente infundados y los perpetre a sabiendas del daño que eso puede hacer a un país que, dicho sea de paso, ha sido y sigue siendo un país de inmigrantes, es decir, de manera frívola e irresponsable. Saber hacer dinero, como ser un as en el ajedrez o pateando una pelota, no presupone nada más que una habilidad muy específica para un quehacer dado. Se puede ser millonario siendo —para todo lo demás— un tonto irrecuperable y un inculto pertinaz, y todo parece indicar que el señor Trump pertenece a esa variante lastimosa de la especie.

Se puede tener muchísimo dinero siendo,
para todo lo demás, un inculto pertinaz

Pero sería también muy injusto concluir, como han hecho algunos a raíz de las intemperancias retóricas del magnate inmobiliario, que el racismo y demás prejuicios discriminatorios y sectarios son la esencia del capitalismo, su producto más refinado e inevitable. No sólo no es así. Estados Unidos son la mejor prueba de que una sociedad multirracial, multicultural y multirreligiosa puede existir, desarrollarse y progresar a un ritmo muy notable, creando oportunidades que atraen a sus playas a gentes de todo el planeta. Estados Unidos es el primer país de nuestro tiempo gracias a esa miríada de pobres gentes que, desesperadas por no encontrar alicientes ni oportunidades en sus propios países, fueron allí a romperse el alma, trabajando sin tregua y, a la vez que se labraban un porvenir, construyeron un gran país, la primera potencia multicultural de la historia moderna.

Al igual que los irlandeses, los escandinavos, los alemanes, los franceses, los españoles, los italianos, los japoneses, los indios, los judíos y los árabes, los hispanos han contribuido de manera muy efectiva a hacer de Estados Unidos lo que es. Si en cualquier país, hoy, resulta una sandez hablar de sociedades pulquérrimas, no mezcladas, lo es todavía más en Estados Unidos, donde, debido a la flexibilidad de su sistema que concede oportunidades a todos quienes quieren y saben trabajar, la sociedad se ha ido renovando sin tregua, asimilando e integrando a gentes procedentes de los cuatro puntos cardinales. En este sentido, Estados Unidos son la sociedad punta de nuestro tiempo, el ejemplo que tarde o temprano deberán seguir —abriendo sus fronteras a todos— los países que quieran llegar a ser (o seguir siendo) modernos, en un mundo marcado por la globalización. La existencia de un Donald Trump en su seno no debe hacernos olvidar esa estimulante verdad.

Donald Trump vs. Atticus Finch. De Cristina López

El magnate del entretenimiento y los bienes raíces Donald Trump, ha perdido ya más de 50 millones de dólares en el último mes: todo por la sarta de ridiculeces que salen de su boca y que han ocasionado el boicot de muchas de las marcas con las que su nombre está asociado. ¿La base de su argumento?  Que a Estados Unidos le falta construir una pared para impedir la entrada de los “ilegales”, a quienes acusó de ser violadores y narcotraficantes. 

Cristina LópezCristina López, 20 julio 2015 / EDH

Independientemente de que las contribuciones de los inmigrantes sean cuantificablemente millonarias cuando de economía se trata, o de que a estas alturas la población estadounidense se esté diversificando tanto que ya sean más los lugares donde no hay ciudadanos que no compartan algún grado de conexión con algún inmigrante, sea esta romántica, filial, laboral o social.

Irónicamente, y en una señal que haría al más optimista perder la fe en la racionalidad de un sector del electorado estadounidense, la retahíla de argumentos anti-inmigrantes de Trump le ha dado también un enorme empujón en las encuestas y se encuentra–quizás de manera temporal y superficial– liderando el pelotón de republicanos que ambicionan la nominación presidencial de su partido. Lo que significa que, a pesar del rechazo mediático, aunque sea para un grupo de personas, los argumentos de Trump tienen algo de validez.

El mayor problema de las declaraciones de Trump no es el enorme agujero que deja su la falacia argumental (que por cierto, va algo así: a. Los inmigrantes no me gustan. B. Los violadores y narcotraficantes no me gustan. Entonces, los inmigrantes son violadores y narcotraficantes). El problema real –y por eso asusta que entre las condenas aún existan vítores para las declaraciones del magnate– es el racismo.

Ese, que supuestamente iba a terminar con el triunfo de los derechos civiles en los sesenta y setenta, y que dicen, es generacional, todavía asoma la cabeza en las declaraciones de políticos, comentaristas televisivos y ciudadanos comunes. El mismo desprecio por lo diferente y lo otro, el mismo deseo de homologar el todo, pluralizar y generalizar, en base a conductas singulares, aisladas e individuales.

La mejor crítica a lo anterior la dio de manera magistral, a través de la voz de su personaje Atticus Finch la laureada autora Harper Lee, en la novela (hasta hace una semana, la única que había publicado) que le dio la fama “Matar a un ruiseñor”. En el monólogo final, el abogado Atticus Finch intenta convencer a un jurado entero de la inocencia de Tim Robinson (un afro-americano acusado injustamente de intentar abusar de una mujer blanca) señalando este mismo absurdo: “ese asumir perverso: que todos los negros mienten, que todos los negros son inmorales, que ningún negro es de confiar cerca de las mujeres (…) y la verdad es que, algunos negros mienten, algunos negros son inmorales y a algunos negros no son de confiar cerca de las mujeres (…), pero es una verdad que aplica a toda la raza humana y a ninguna raza en particular”.

Es por esta simple verdad que no es desproporcionada la reacción de varias marcas y millones de consumidores de boicotear a Trump. Y es en estas ocasiones cuando el libre mercado, con la libertad de asociación que lleva implícita, mejor demuestra su valor: permitiendo a los individuos condenar aquello que no comparten, con la esperanza de que en el futuro, quienes aún buscan cosechar fama con comentarios racistas y prejuiciados, aprendan una lección.

@crislopezg